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Locations


Cincinnati, Ohio (800) 543-7225
Dayton, Ohio (800) 672-6810
Indianapolis, Indiana (800) 382-9029
Teléfono Español (888) 720-9794

Abortion Care Options


The Women's Med Center has conveniently located offices. We offer a variety of options to personalize your care. Click here to see which can best cater to your needs.

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FAQs

FAQ


How common are abortions?
How safe is it to have an abortion?
Will my confidentiality be protected?
How much does an abortion cost?
Do insurance companies pay for abortions?
Will I experience labor?
Will I feel pain?
What are the differences in a local and general anesthesia?
How long does an abortion take? How long will I be there?
Can someone be with me during surgery and recovery?
When can I eat after surgery?
Is there anything special I should do after the abortion?
Can I go to work/school the next day?
Will I have to wait long for an appointment?
How many times will I have to visit your Center?
How is the length of pregnancy calculated?
Should I worry about the protestors outside the Center?
Can patients or visitors use cell phones while at the Center?
Why are children not allowed in the Center?

How common are abortions?
You are not alone in your experience here today. Half of all American women have experienced an unintended pregnancy. At current rates, more than one-third will have had an abortion by age 45.

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How safe is it to have an abortion?
The Women’s Med Center has a very low complication rate that is below 1%.

An abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy (first three months) is considered minor surgery. It does not involve any cutting or incision and the actual procedure takes about five minutes.

There are some risks with having an abortion, but the risks are less in the first three months of pregnancy. Sometimes an infection may occur. The chances of having an infection are 1 in 10,000 women. We provide you with medication and instructions to help you avoid infection.

Risk of internal damage to the uterus or other organs is 1 in 10,000 women. Our specially trained physicians are highly skilled and each has over 25 years experience in performing abortions.

Carrying a pregnancy to full term carries much higher risks for women under the age of 20. One (1) in every 400,000 women dies from an abortion whereas 12 out of 100,000 (48 times greater) die from carrying a pregnancy full term. If the pregnancy is continued, risk of injury or serious illness is 100 times greater than with an abortion.

Sometimes not all tissue is removed and a D&C (dilation & curettage) must be preformed. This occurs 1 in 500 patients.

Follow up care after an abortion is essential. The Women’s Med Center asks you to call us one week after your procedure to let us know how you are doing. We also encourage you to return to us for a free follow up exam or see your physician three weeks after your procedure to make sure you are healing correctly and there isn’t any infection.

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Will my confidentiality be protected?
Yes. We are a private medical practice and your confidentiality is paramount to us. Access to your medical records is protected by federal and state laws and by our own internal policies. A copy of our privacy policy is included in the forms available on this website.

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How much does an abortion cost?
The Womens Med Center fees are all inclusive. Click here for a full description of our fees.

Several things determine the cost of an abortion:

      (1) length of the pregnancy,

 

      (2) type of procedure being used, and

 

    (3) type of anesthesia.

An early pregnancy abortion, up to 11 weeks, costs less than an advanced pregnancy abortion. As the pregnancy advances after 11 weeks the cost increases approximately $100 per week due to the increased supplies and time required to perform them. The cost for a late second trimester procedure can cost up to as much as $3,000.

Several types of anesthesia are used. The most common are the local and general anesthesia. You are awake with the local. Usually the cervix is numbed and sometimes an additional medication is given to relax you. This procedure is the less expensive method. The most expensive method is a general anesthesia that puts you to sleep.

Most abortions are provided in an out-patient facility but some are done in a hospital setting. Hospitals charge more than out-patient facilities.

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Do insurance companies pay for abortions?
Many insurance companies will cover an abortion procedure. Every policy is different. To determine whether your policy covers abortion, call your insurance company and ask them if they pay for an outpatient, elective abortion.

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Will I experience labor?
The methods used by the Women’s Med Center do not induce labor.

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Will I feel pain?
Every woman is different and not everyone has the same tolerance level for discomfort. Most women who have the procedure with local anesthesia describe the discomfort as similar to severe menstrual cramping for a few minutes.

Women who have general anesthesia experience no pain during the procedure and have menstrual-like cramps when they wake up.

After the procedure, our physicians recommend ibuprofen or whatever a woman normally takes for menstrual cramps – products such as Advil, Aleve or Tylenol. Aspirin is not recommended because it may increase bleeding.

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What are the differences in a local and general anesthesia?
The local anesthesia numbs the cervical area and you are awake during the procedure. Recovery time is quicker than general anesthesia. You may eat 6 hours before your procedure and drive home afterward. Local anesthesia is also lower in cost.

General anesthesia is administered intravenously and puts you to sleep during the procedure. Food and liquids should not be taken 12 hours prior to the procedure. You will not be able to drive after the procedure. Recovery time is longer, approximately 45 minutes. The cost is $200 to $225 more than the local anesthesia.

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How long does an abortion take? How long will I be there?
The D&C procedure for a first trimester patient (6 to 13.5 weeks LMP) takes approximately 5 to 7 minutes. The D&E procedure for a second trimester patient (14 to 22 weeks LMP) takes about 10 to 15 minutes.

The normal time spent at our Center is 1-1/2 to2-1/2 hours from your arrival to discharge for a pre-abortion visit or for a suction curettage. For a D&E, expect to be there 3 hours as more time is needed for recovery before leaving.

For the medical abortion visit, the time is about 1 hour.

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Can someone be with me during surgery and recovery?
All patients are encouraged to bring a support person, but it is not required unless you are having general anesthesia or heavy sedation.

We understand the desire for friends or relatives to be with a woman during this process. Because these are surgical areas, restrictions for maintaining a sterile environment and for privacy needs of all our patients require that friends and relatives wait in our waiting areas.

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When can I eat after surgery?
After surgery you may eat as soon as you feel like it. Many women have hearty appetites. Some prefer a lighter meal initially, especially if they have an upset stomach.

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Is there anything special I should do after the abortion?
You will receive a home–care packet of post op instructions which includes important information. Please read these instructions. The “Follow-Up Care” sheet is very important and includes our 24-hour emergency phone number.

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Can I go to work/school the next day?
Most activities can be resumed the next day. Patients are asked to avoid long periods of standing, heavy lifting of pushing. These activities may cause increased bleeding and cramping.

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Will I have to wait long for an appointment?
All of our Centers offer a wide variety of appointment times to meet your needs. We see most patients within a few days of their initial call.

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How many times will I have to visit your Center?
Both the Ohio and Indiana legislatures have passed laws requiring patients to be seen by a health care provider prior to beginning an pregnancy termination procedure. In Ohio, the visit must be with a physician at least 24 hours in advance. In Indiana, the visit must be with a physician, nurse practitioner or other listed healthcare provider at least 18 hours in advance.

The first visit for the pre-abortion appointment can be shortened by downloading our forms from this website and completing them at home before your first visit.

First trimester patients (6 through 13.5 weeks LMP) visit our Centers twice, once for the pre-abortion visit and once for the procedure or to take the pill for the medical abortion.

Second trimester patients (14 through 22 weeks LMP) make three visits. The first is for the pre-abortion visit. The second is for dilataria insertion. The dilataria absorbs moisture and expands slowly overnight. On the third day the dilataria are removed and the D&E procedure is completed. The second and third days must be consecutive.

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How is the length of pregnancy calculated?
An initial calculation is done by determining the first day of the last menstrual cycle rather than the date of actual conception. That date is confirmed by an ultrasound and pelvic exam.

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Should I worry about the protestors outside the Center?
Occasionally there are one to several people standing on the public sidewalk. Our privately owned parking lots are next to our buildings and separate the demonstrators from our patients.

Although they can be annoying, protestors have a legal right to voice their opinion on the public right of way. They are not, however, allowed to step onto our property. We have security measures in place to ensure your safety. If you have any specific concerns or would like to be escorted to your car, please let us know.

While it is legal for protestors to demonstrate, you can make your voice heard by supporting pro choice candidates on election day.

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Can patients or visitors use cell phones while at the Center?
Respect for patient confidentiality is something we work very hard to achieve. With the popularity of cell phones that take photographs and videos, we want to make sure your privacy protected. As a result, we ask that you leave your cell phone in your car. Additionally, we have found that cell phone usage in our waiting areas can be very distracting to others.

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Why are children not allowed in the Center?
Children can sometimes be a distraction. Our medical staff needs the full attention of our patients and their support person. Also, making the decision not to have a child and then seeing children, can be upsetting.

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